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A highly-modular (typescript-friendly)-framework agnostic library for serializing data to the JSON:API specification

mathematic-inc
mathematic-inc
pushedAt 2 months ago

mathematic-inc/ts-japi

ts-japi / Exports


{ts:japi}



node-current License: Apache 2.0

A highly-modular (typescript-friendly)-framework agnostic library for serializing data to the JSON:API specification

Features

  • This is the only typescript-compatible library that fully types the JSON:API specification and performs proper serialization.
  • Zero dependencies.
  • This is the only library with resource recursion.
  • The modular framework laid out here highly promotes the specifications intentions:
    • Using links is no longer obfuscated.
    • Meta can truly be placed anywhere with possible dependencies laid out visibly.
  • This library is designed to adhere to the specifications "never remove, only add" policy, so we will remain backwards-compatible.

Documentation

The documentation has everything that is covered here and more.

Installation

You can install ts-japi in your project's directory as usual:

npm install ts-japi

Getting Started

There are fives classes that are used to serialize data (only one of which is necessarily required).

You can check the documentation for a deeper insight into the usage.

Examples

You can check the examples and the test folders to see some examples (such as the ones below). You can check this example to see almost every option of Serializer exhausted.

Serialization

The Serializer class is the only class required for basic serialization.

The following example constructs the most basic Serializer: (Note the await)

import { Serializer } from '../src';
import { User } from '../test/models';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

const UserSerializer = new Serializer('users');

(async () => {
  const user = new User('sample_user_id');

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(await UserSerializer.serialize(user)));

  // Output: {
  //  jsonapi: { version: '1.0' },
  //  data: {
  //   type: 'users',
  //   id: 'sample_user_id',
  //   attributes: {
  //     createdAt: '2020-05-20T15:44:37.650Z',
  //     articles: [],
  //     comments: []
  //   }
  //  }
  // }
})();

Links

The Linker class is used to generate a normalized document link. Its methods are not meant to be called. See the FAQ for reasons.

The following example constructs a Linker for Users and Articles:

import { Linker } from '../src';
import { User, Article } from '../test/models';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

// The last argument should almost always be an array or a single object type.
// The reason for this is the potential for linking several articles.
const UserArticleLinker = new Linker((user: User, articles: Article | Article[]) => {
  return Array.isArray(articles)
    ? `https://www.example.com/users/${user.id}/articles/`
    : `https://www.example.com/users/${user.id}/articles/${articles.id}`;
});

// ! The rest of this example is just to illustrate internal behavior.
(async () => {
  const user = new User('sample_user_id');
  const article = new Article('same_article_id', user);

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(UserArticleLinker.link(user, article)));

  // Output: https://www.example.com/users/sample_user_id/articles/same_article_id
})();

Pagination

The Paginator class is used to generate pagination links. Its methods are not meant to be called.

The following example constructs a Paginator:

import { Paginator } from '../src';
import { User, Article } from '../test/models';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

const ArticlePaginator = new Paginator((articles: Article | Article[]) => {
  if (Array.isArray(articles)) {
    const nextPage = Number(articles[0].id) + 1;
    const prevPage = Number(articles[articles.length - 1].id) - 1;
    return {
      first: `https://www.example.com/articles/0`,
      last: `https://www.example.com/articles/10`,
      next: nextPage <= 10 ? `https://www.example.com/articles/${nextPage}` : null,
      prev: prevPage >= 0 ? `https://www.example.com/articles/${prevPage}` : null,
    };
  }
  return;
});

// ! The rest of this example is just to illustrate internal behavior.
(async () => {
  const user = new User('sample_user_id');
  const article = new Article('same_article_id', user);

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(ArticlePaginator.paginate([article])));

  // Output: {
  //  first: 'https://www.example.com/articles/0',
  //  last: 'https://www.example.com/articles/10',
  //  prev: null,
  //  next: null
  // }
})();

Relationships

The Relator class is used to generate top-level included data as well as resource-level relationships. Its methods are not meant to be called.

Relators may also take optional Linkers (using the linker option) to define relationship links and related resource links.

The following example constructs a Relator for Users and Articles:

import { Serializer, Relator } from '../src';
import { User, Article } from '../test/models';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

const ArticleSerializer = new Serializer<Article>('articles');
const UserArticleRelator = new Relator<User, Article>(
  async (user) => user.getArticles(),
  ArticleSerializer
);

// ! The rest of this example is just to illustrate some internal behavior.
(async () => {
  const user = new User('sample_user_id');
  const article = new Article('same_article_id', user);
  User.save(user);
  Article.save(article);

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(await UserArticleRelator.getRelationship(user)));

  // Output: { data: [ { type: 'articles', id: 'same_article_id' } ] }
})();

Metadata

The Metaizer class is used to construct generate metadata given some dependencies. There are several locations Metaizer can be used:

Like Linker, its methods are not meant to be called.

The following example constructs a Metaizer:

import { User, Article } from '../test/models';
import { Metaizer } from '../src';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

// The last argument should almost always be an array or a single object type.
// The reason for this is the potential for metaizing several articles.
const UserArticleMetaizer = new Metaizer((user: User, articles: Article | Article[]) => {
  return Array.isArray(articles)
    ? { user_created: user.createdAt, article_created: articles.map((a) => a.createdAt) }
    : { user_created: user.createdAt, article_created: articles.createdAt };
});

// ! The rest of this example is just to illustrate internal behavior.
(async () => {
  const user = new User('sample_user_id');
  const article = new Article('same_article_id', user);

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(UserArticleMetaizer.metaize(user, article)));

  // Output: {
  //  user_created: '2020-05-20T15:39:43.277Z',
  //  article_created: '2020-05-20T15:39:43.277Z'
  // }
})();

Serializing Errors

The ErrorSerializer class is used to serialize any object considered an error (the attributes option allows you to choose what attributes to use during serialization). Alternatively (recommended), you can construct custom errors by extending the JapiError class and use those for all server-to-client errors.

The error serializer test includes an example of the alternative solution.

The following example constructs the most basic ErrorSerializer: (Note the lack of await)

import { ErrorSerializer } from '../src';
import { getJSON } from '../test/utils/get-json';

const PrimitiveErrorSerializer = new ErrorSerializer();

(async () => {
  const error = new Error('badness');

  console.log('Output:', getJSON(PrimitiveErrorSerializer.serialize(error)));

  // Output: {
  //  errors: [ { code: 'Error', detail: 'badness' } ],
  //  jsonapi: { version: '1.0' }
  // }
})();

Caching

The Cache class can be placed in a Serializer's cache option. Alternatively, setting that option to true will provide a default Cache.

The default Cache uses the basic Object.is function to determine if input data are the same. If you want to adjust this, instantiate a new Cache with a resolver.

Deserialization

We stress the following: Given that there are many clients readily built to consume JSON:API endpoints (see here), we do not provide deserialization. In particular, since unmarshalling data is strongly related to the code it will be used in (e.g. React), tighter integration is recommended over an unnecessary abstraction.

Remarks

There are several model classes used inside TS:JAPI such as Resource and Relationships. These models are used for normalization as well as traversing a JSON:API document. If you plan to fork this repo, you can extend these models and reimplement them to create your own custom (non-standard, extended) serializer.

FAQ

Why not just allow optional functions that return the internal Link Class (or just a URI string)?

The Link class is defined to be as general as possible in case of changes in the specification. In particular, the implementation of metadata and the types in our library rely on the generality of the Link class. Relying on user arguments will generate a lot of overhead for both us and users whenever the specs change.

Why does the Meta class exist if it is essentially just a plain object?

In case the specification is updated to change the meta objects in some functional way.

What is "resource recursion"?

Due to compound documents, it is possible to recurse through related resources via their resource linkages and obtain included resources beyond primary data relations. This is should be done with caution (see SerializerOptions.depth and this example)

For Developers

To get started in developing this library, run yarn install, yarn build and yarn test (in this precise order) to assure everything is in working order.

Contributing

This project is maintained by the author, however contributions are welcome and appreciated. You can find TS:JAPI on GitHub: https://github.com/mu-io/ts-japi

Feel free to submit an issue, but please do not submit pull requests unless it is to fix some issue. For more information, read the contribution guide.

License

Copyright © 2020 mu-io.

Licensed under Apache 2.0.

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